Posts tagged “outlaw country

Throwback Thursday: Kandia Crazy Horse & Black Banjo @ the Schomburg Center NYPL

Many moons ago, I worked at the Schomburg Center For Research In Black Culture of the New York Public Library system — in the last days of the tenure there of my hometown hero Ellis Haizlip, onetime host of the best television show ever: SOUL! I was seeing Mr. Haizlip’s ghost ’round every corner, strolling around in his typical dashiki & tailored slacks, last night @ the Schomburg even before his name was invoked by an elder audience member after the Black Banjo event we were in attendance at the Langston Hughes Auditorium: Banjo Stories & Songs From Haiti & New Orleans, featuring my acquaintance Laurent Dubois (a banjo-playing, Belgian-American scholar from Duke University; I did a talk with him @ CUNY Graduate Center in Midtown back in the spring for the release of his new Harvard tome: The Banjo – America’s African Instrument) & my new friend Leyla McCalla, the Haitian-American banjoist who resides in New Orleans singing songs in English, French, Kreyol & the lone member of my friends’ band the Carolina Chocolate Drops that I had yet to meet. The cited episode of SOUL! featured Taj Mahal (ex-Rising Sons) doing an entire suite of banjo & ole-timey music, talking about the instrument’s African origins and encouraging youngbloods to take up the instrument; this aired back when I was a babychile and obviously there remains a stark racial & generational divide regarding banjo players when the instrument is trendy primarily amongst white Millennials who adopted it after the release of the Coen Brothers’ pastoral pastiche film O! Brother Where Art Thou? with its peerless ole-timey/Americana soundtrack, and the rise of these bands in the Aughts: Mumford & Sons, The Avett Brothers (I was one of the first to cover them as a rock/country critic alongside the Carolina Chocolate Drops, as they were emerging from the North Carolina Piedmont), & Old Crow Medicine Show. Nothing against these bands & the untimely passing of Pete Seeger has also played a role – indeed, he looms large in Laurent’s book — but we still have high hopes that young black kids will get hip to the banjo & take up our decades of work in keeping the black twang musical traditions thriving. I was interviewed for Joaquin Cotler’s podcast on these issues after Leyla’s performance, at the Schomburg; I will share it when it airs.

My dear #BlackHillbilly / twang family of the Ebony Hillbillies were also special guests like myself & we were in high cotton, enjoying the themes and music of the program. The Ebony Hillbillies generously performed at the Standing Rock benefit I curated @ Decolonize This Place back at the dawn of October; I look forward to future collaborations with them — and now — also with Sistah Leyla.

The banjo was my favorite instrument even before I knew of its African roots & I still hope to take it up — possibly in 2017, since I have been invited to the Danny Barker banjo festival in New Orleans by the guitarist/banjoist Detroit Brooks Sr. of jazz titan Donald Harrison’s band who does a lot of outreach in his community and beyond to keep black banjo traditions alive. Black artists (& the Afropolitan ones trying to appropriate southern accents and songlines in the UK) in country music are not a novelty nor a trend; whatever the outcome for current youtube sensation Kane Brown, who’s an Afro-Native (Tsalagi)/biracial country singer from rural Georgia in the “bro” mold (Young Kane & I have several thangs in common), we are here to stay. So #SaddleUp!

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( Leyla McCalla of New Orleans & Kandia Crazy Horse of Hudson Canyon, Sistahs of Twang, @ Schomburg Center, Harlem NYC )

img_4439 ( Kandia Crazy Horse & Kimberly Robison, Virginia Native American songbirds/activists of Cactus Rose + Gloria Gassaway, Catawba lead vocalist/bones player/activist of the Ebony Hillbillies (from South Carolina) – We southern belles love to gather, do actions for #StandingRock & sing to honor our Ancestors. Miz Gloria almost went out to Standing Rock last week with our heroine Pure Fe of Ulali; we hope to combine our efforts & make a sojourn together soon come – A’ho* )

img_4268 (Throwback to last Thursday night in SoHo @ Morrison Hotel Gallery for private view of Neil Young: Long May You Run exhibit, featuring photographs by Henry Diltz, Joel Bernstein, Danny Clinch & others. Here I am “waging heavy peace” with Henry’s famed image of my hero Neil & his dog Harte in the barn door of his ranch in California, Broken Arrow (named after my favorite Buffalo Springfield native american-themed tune & a Delmer Daves western from the early 1950s), from the year I was born, NYC)
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Rebel Music In The Hour Of Chaos 12/12: On the State of protest music & activism in 2016 (final poster) #NoDAPL #BlackPower50 #IStandWithSplitRock

Beautiful poster art in my favorite color, by our brother-in-struggle Kyle Goen #kyledidthis

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Rebel Music In The Hour Of Chaos: protest music concert @ Decolonize This Place NYC 12/12

“Rebel Music In The Hour Of Chaos:” Music emanates directly from my indigenous soul. Therefore, it immediately made sense for me to perform my music again this year as a soundtrack to our overlapping struggles – including #NoDAPL. Sounds, including freedom songs past & present, most powerfully link us together & amplify what’s transpiring from the actions in the streets. I was born in the Season of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going’ On,” an album that dominated my childhood as the strivings for Total Revolution continued past the 1960s societal upheaval; and the inspiration to become an artist-activist sprang from that era. I remain under the influence of rebel music from many artists and cultures – Please join us on Monday 12 December @ Decolonize This Place. 55 Walker St, TriBeCa NYC (Doors 8pm). when we will perform some songs of protest & be in conversation about our activism with Brotha Rob Fields (Bold As Love / Black Rock Coalition) – A’ho! Cactus Rose ft. Special Guests: Abiodun Oyewole (The Last Poets) & Mahina Movement

This may be our final show of 2016, so we really appreciate you coming through & all of your support during the many Standing Rock resistance actions – Wopila tanka, y’all

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 ( Afro-Native sisterhood from Virginia: Kimberly Robison/KAR & Kandia Crazy Horse of Cactus Rose, Native Americana / cosmic country band, @ Decolonize This Place in TriBeCa this past Sunday for Black Art & Activism Now, curated by Dr. Camara Holloway & Tavia Nyong’o (Yale University) )

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( preliminary poster for REBEL MUSIC IN THE HOUR OF CHAOS by artist Kyle Goen (Decolonize This Place/MTO Collective) #KyleDidThis )

img_4092 ( Jeff McLaughlin, lead guitarist / vocals of Cactus Rose )

img_4257 ( Kandia Crazy Horse with Lorena, Vaimoana & Gabby of Mahina Movement @ Decolonize This Place NYC )

img_3640 ( Kandia Crazy Horse & Abiodun Oyewole of The Last Poets – Cactus Rose Instagram: @cactusroselovesyou )


Still Standing In Solidarity With Standing Rock #mniwiconi #NoDAPL

As I have been these many months, I continue to be engaged in the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance in solidarity with the Oceti Sakowin of North Dakota – & now, supporting Split Rock as well (sanctioned by Red Warrior Camp), in solidarity with my cousin’s wife’s people, the Ramapough Lunaape of New Jersey, in order to stop the construction of the Algonquin Pipeline. Due to the escalation of attacks on the water protectors @ Standing Rock last Sunday night, I am receiving many communications on the cause & have now been invited to perform at yet another benefit for the camps, which will take place in NYC before Christmas. Other things are afoot as well & will relate about them as they unfold. Glad to note my Virginia Native great aunt is taking up flooding the phones to the president & state representatives with her circle of elders on behalf of Standing Rock!

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( Kandia Crazy Horse, water protector, in Midtown NYC #mniwiconi #NoDAPL #NoAIM #defendthesacred #blacksnakekillers of Turtle Island )

For now, reflecting on having participated in the rally > march for Standing Rock last Wednesday @ Trump Tower in Midtown Manhattan & then performing at the Benefit For Water Protectors of #StandingRock on Friday night — making our debut as Cactus Rose at Brooklyn’s famed Jalopy Theater for ole-timey/hillbilly/folk/mountain music. It was an honor to serve as the headliner for this benefit, with our special guest: Seminole/Shawnee/Mikisúkî singer/songwriter/activist Lonnie Moon Fire Harrington. I have been told by the organizer that the event raised almost $2,000 in donations, so – Wopila tanka to all who came through!

Enjoying these last days of #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth — before band rehearsals resume for our full slate of December performances & attending two events this week for artists I greatly admire: tomorrow’s BET screening of the Sharon Jones documentary (in memoriam) & the private viewing of Morrison Hotel Gallery’s traveling Neil Young exhibit in SoHo on Thursday evening. Looking forward to seeing y’all out-n-about, as well as at the Standing Rock teach-in later this week @ Decolonize This Place – A’ho!

img_0252 ( Cactus Rose, Native Americana/cosmic country band, debut @ Jalopy Theater – pix by Jan Bell of The Maybelles )

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America: We Got To Work for Peace

“We got to work for Peace / Peace ain’t gonna be free / Gotta go to war…” so often sang my late hero & artist-activist influence Gil Scott-Heron (but he was not a warhawk, he was singing of peace-waging), when I used to see him annually in NYC at venues such as S.O.B.’s downtown. And, while I listened to his tunes “B-Movie” (about Ray-Gun America in the 1980s), “Winter In America” (a reminder for #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth & due to escalated actions around the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance & halting other black snakes of Turtle Island) & “Gun” (for obvious reasons in trigger-happy America & upon Veterans Day), this week & then just spoke with my Pamunkey great aunt Ethel from Virginia, who is an activist/southern belle/church lady in the truest sense & at 91 would have been embedded all year @ Standing Rock were it not for ailments, I was reminded indelibly that we cannot despair at this hour of chaos after the presidential election. We must be strong, we must be prayerful if we follow Native tradition & other faiths, and we must seek to be united as possible in order to work for Peace in the coming days of a New Nation that does not honor nor respect the rights of all of its citizens.

img_3456 ( Caitlin Rose & Kandia Crazy Horse @ Mercury Lounge NYC (w/ photobomb by Roddy of Daniel Romano’s band – Follow @cactusroselovesyou on Instagram )

2016: A year of sonic loss, domestic terrorism against #NoDAPL water protectors & days of rage in newly-minted Trump America…I will not retire from my activism & I am feeling a renewed dedication to songwriting, illuminating the folkways of the postmodern New South, and collaborating with other (Native) artists that also follow the Way of the New World to work towards indigenous futures. So, instead of wallowing — although I was/am mighty weary — I went out into the fractious City, finding fellowship & even some laughs with other indigenous activists from near and far as well as musicians from Argentina (Nico), Canada (Daniel Romano & band), & my sistah-in-twang Caitlin Rose (Nashville via Texas). While we raised a toast of Tecate backstage @ Mercury Lounge in the East Village/Lower East Side to Canadian singer-songwriter icon #LeonardCohen & #MightyBaby’s Martin Stone who just passed & then I rotated sounds of my treasured record collection overnight in their memory + for Veterans Day (my step-great-grandfather Mr. Bridges of SW Georgia fought bravely in World War I & always remember him upon this day) — Elyse Weinberg, Stevie Nicks (who I mightily wish I could catch on her current tour!) & Fleetwood Mac, Jon Lucien, Rufus Wainwright — it was deeply impressed upon me that we must be thankful that #WeAreStillHere able to sing, play, laugh, dance & write songs, despite possible dark days ahead on Turtle Island and all of the many sad losses that have befallen the music world in 2016. As discussed with #CaitlinRose, I look forward to playing in Nashville, doing some festivals & sharing new songs in 2017, with my trusty band Cactus Rose holding me down. Some don’t like (colored) women who are brave & fly the freak flag high; there are concurrent wars against us of the #NoDAPL resistance and the collective body of black women in this society; and there are some entities that have tried/want to silence my Voice – but still I shine on. And I am going to stay #BlackHillbilly ’til I die. Here’s to #TGIF — as my great aunt would say — and looking forward to enjoying the remainder of #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

A’ho #countrygirlsdoitbetter

img_3397 ( Nico Bereciartua of Magpie Salute (from Argentina) & Kandia Crazy Horse of Cactus Rose band (in hat Karen Dalton) @ Henry Diltz’ Morrison Hotel Gallery in SoHo for “Midnight Rider” photography exhibit on Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers Band by Patricia O’Driscoll, NYC )

>>>>>>—–))—>

( Why I want to see Stevie Nicks (who I have never seen) live…She composed this song “Silver Springs” while on the Road in my homeplace of the #DMV. I used to spend special times with my late mother in Silver Spring in the brief period before she walked on & grew up going there often in my “Maryland is for crabs…Virginia is for lovers” shirt in the 1970s. Precious memories…& songwriting inspiration! )

( How I came to truly know/love Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” – via my beloved & the best male Songbird of my generation #JeffBuckley (RIP) #ScorpioRising #ScorpioSeason – In Memoriam for all the Singers & Players & Freedom Fighters )

( & Leonard Cohen & Jeff Buckley’s acolyte who’s one of my most beloved contemporary artists: #RufusWainwright – This 11/11 tune comes from his double-LP masterpiece Want One / Want Two that was life-changing for me in the early Aughts. I still treasure getting to meet Rufus once backstage at a taping of the Jimmy Fallon Show in Manhattan, courtesy of my brotha Kirk Douglas of The Roots )


Make America Native Again & #ImWithHer – Presidential Election 2016

I am an independent, stubborn southern belle & outlaw queen — Always been, always will be. Still, I believe #TheFutureIsFemale & I am also, of course, here for #IndigenousFutures – so I voted today in remembrance of my heroines: my Pamunkey mother Anne Marie from the Shenandoah Valley & Miz Fannie Lou Hamer, The Black Panther of Lowndes County. Sho’nuff, neither party gave us much of a decent choice & Kaine has only paid lip service to #NoDAPL on the eve of the election, smacking of desperation. Yet I have got to take the long view for the Turtle Island Liberation Movement I am a part of & with deep south kin still alive who were persecuted and firebombed by the Ku Klux Klan for daring to vote & mobilize their African-descent community to do so, I will never take my right to vote for granted. And a #NastyGal does step into the breach & flex her power, too – Love, that’s America! A’ho*

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#KandiaCrazyHorse #NativeAmericana #singersongwriter #CosmicAmericanMusic #NativeAmerican #artist #activist #indigenousrevolutionary #AfroHippie #IStandWithStandingRock #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #LoveWillWin #Merica

Sidenote: as a Black Bullette/Taurus Woman & Wonderlove(r), this was great to read today: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/stevie-wonder-driving-equals-trump-presidency_us_5820c1a0e4b0aac62485fa21 KANDIA CRAZY HORSE loves STEVIE WONDER (a key influence)

img_1653 ( Kandia Crazy Horse #IdleNoMore in the voter queue today in Hamilton Heights / Harlem-on-the-Range, Uptown NYC – @cactusroselovesyou Instagram )

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( Coming out of my polling place, a school named for Adam Clayton Powell Jr. – IG: @cactusroselovesyou )

img_1652 ( Some local Latina sisters were gifting us #StarsAndStripes Hershey kisses while we waited to vote #VoteNYC – IG: @cactusroselovesyou )


Throwback Thursday: Of race, Country music & the 2016 CMAs

Well, since my sentiments about the state of Nashville’s country music establishment on and beyond Music Row tend to be unwelcome even amongst my former circle of rock critic colleagues, I wasn’t going to weigh in on this year’s CMA Awards, the 50th edition, which I did happen to watch. However, in my absence offline, an apparent controversy has been brewing on the subject of race and country music, due to the much ballyhooed performance of “Daddy Lessons” by Texan artists Beyonce (pop, urban) & the Dixie Chicks (once modern country royalty). Although I don’t wish to gas up TMZ, the site is one of the prominent places that has cited the CMA site & social media having scrubbed their entire online platform of images/references to said Beyonce-Dixie Chicks summit in response to copious racist reactions to the awards show appearance on Twitter & elsewhere: VIEW HERE

Now, I am no Beyonce fan nor “stan;” and I have no fear of the BeyHive in stating this — my backpages as a longtime music critic & editor for over 20 years clearly delineates where I stand on her & chronicles many of my thoughts on the history and contemporary scene of black artists who create in the overlapping country & western, bluegrass, hillbilly, Cajun, prewar stringband, mountain music, Americana, and roots genres. I also happen to have served on a panel @ CUNY Graduate Center in NYC earlier this year, holding forth on Black Banjo, my role in the country & western genre as an artist and touring fan, the Affrilachia movement, and the recent publication of scholar/banjoist Laurent Dubois’ book THE BANJO – America’s African Instrument. Talked about the fictional Darlings of The Andy Griffith Show a.k.a. The Dillards, and how Doug Dillard became my favorite banjo player and influence via Dillard & Clark. And I am a veteran of my friend Greg Mays’ annual Harlem Hoedown, where I always square dance as I learned as a babychile in rural Virginia to the sounds of my dear friends the Ebony Hillbillies. I was a “primordial” adopter, supporter, and then critic of the Americana scene in general, way back into the 1980s, and have watched successive waves of cowpunk, neo-southern rock, alt-country, y’allternative, insurgent country, progressive country, Ameripolitan, indie folk, etc etc come to consciousness and come to market; and always pondered about the African presence in all of these scenes and on the record business side up to this day where  Americana is now on the Billboard chart — the year’s big news in music. The pop/urban mix with country as a featured event of the CMA Awards has obvious precedent; many of my former colleagues are still talking about Justin Timberlake (who’s in the process of going Country & recording a country album) performing with Chris Stapleton last year. Yet this year’s turn, especially at the 50 marker, is notable less due to Beyonce but rather down to the fact that at a time when Bro-Country is waning, Taylor Swift has defected for pop, and nigh every classic arena rocker has cut a country record/moved to Nashville to revive flagging careers, country (&western) still has a glaring race problem and its related business wing cannot develop or sustain virtually any artists of color not named Darius Rucker. Opening the show with a too-brief turn by black country icon Charley Pride underscored this issue; the fact that the CMAs chose to have Stapleton and Dwight Yoakam — great & skilled though they are — pay homage to Georgia R&B hero & country maverick Ray Charles, to illustrate the S-O-U-L of country music instead of even summoning their own recent hitmaker Mickey Guyton or Americana star Rhiannon Giddens who was present at the awards (backing up Eric Church) showed exactly where they stand. The citing of SOUL, as it always has been, is code for the blackness in twang; the modern country (&western) scene and business has never quite progressed beyond the early 20th century moment of Race Records and segregating sounds by racial and regional provenance. And all hell broke loose on social media yesterday and today, as country music fans of the dominant culture rushed to show their displeasure with the inclusion of a black (pop) artist on the CMAs, accusing her of trying to take away country music from whites who supposedly have eternal ownership of the genre — despite the patent & well-documented African and Native American origins of country besides the Scotch-Irish contribution. I myself am a Native Americana / cosmic country & western artist in no small part because I am of Native American, African, and Scottish descent, a rich hybrid made in America’s Southeast from which the Source of the music eternally springs. I am also just a fanatic of bluegrass, mountain music, and cowboy tunes — and I claim as much ownership of that Creation as anybody. Keen observers have known for a spell that one of the most vibrant bluegrass scenes in the world is in Japan, and that events and festivals like the Black Banjo Gathering in Boone, North Carolina, have been yielding a younger, new wave of twang talent of African descent.

14925357_541294672731117_8531302700367219900_n (My shot of superstar country artist #BradPaisley & #CharleyPride opening #CMAAwards50 – credit: @kandiacrazyhorse Instagram)

Here’s what I posted in response to the show on Wednesday night, while live-blogging portions of it on Facebook & Instagram: “I am watching #CMAAwards50 & pondering deeply about the African & Native American roots of the genre; plus how far Nashville & Music Row still have to go in honoring these legacies. Wonderful to see my hero #CharleyPride open the show with my fellow Virginian #BradPaisley (Yep, I’m a fan, despite the unwieldy “Accidental Racist;” I blame LL Cool J); but still tinged with some sadness and confusion. Someday, #NativeAmericana & #BlackHillbilly will take their proper place. For now, enjoying seeing all the 1960s & ’70s country women I grew up on that made me aspire to sing in twang, besides my Native American triumvirate (Buffy Sainte-Marie, Karen Dalton, Rita Coolidge): Loretta Lynn, Tanya Tucker, Barbara Mandrell (!!)…& Reba…Waiting for Dolly [Parton], of course…! #KandiaCrazyHorse #NativeAmericana #mountainmusic #AppalachiaSounds from #Virginia #countrysinger #southernbelle #countrygirlsdoitbetter #AffrilachianNation”

Quibbling about how pop or authentically country any given act is — that’s something I leave to the working music critics. Certainly, the Dixie Chicks’ reappearance on the CMAs was controversial due to their past & interesting to have that baggage reexamined so close to the presidential election. Some staunch country loyalists were always going to react negatively to that. Yet the main issue — just as a decade-plus battle for Country Music’s soul reaches its zenith (see the site Saving Country Music for consistent dispatches on this topic) — is that country (&western…& Americana) is the last frontier for artists of African descent — whether that be Virginia-bred me, Kandia Crazy Horse & my new band Cactus Rose, or Kenya’s leading country singer, Sir Elvis Otieno — and the country establishment and much of the genre’s audience still views it as their own private safe haven away from the predations of urban music/culture/style and technology-tied modernity. It is interesting that Bro-Country, which would often feature the likes of Florida-Georgia Line duetting with Nelly and Blake Shelton attempting to rap, is fading just as there is a rise and music industry push behind a range of country and Americana acts that claim rock and other musics as influences or stylistically and attitude-wise invoke 1970s Outlaw Country: Kacey Musgraves, Sturgill Simpson, Margo Price, Sam Outlaw, etc…and are hailed for restoring “true” country sonics and values […with nods to their precursors Shooter Jennings and Hank III (both of whom I often loved & covered as a critic in the past)]. Yet there’s still apparently little to no room under the twang tent for we country artists of color, cosmic or otherwise.

Hey, I love Tompall Glaser and Clarence White & Willie Nelson as much as any other ’70s babe of my generation; and as a singer-songwriter, I am clearly influenced by my most beloved Gene Clark and the Buffalo Springfield — hear my paeans “Quartz Hill” & “Americana” “Tula” (en espanol) & “Scene & Herd” etc — and the less-celebrated Ladies of the Canyon like Judee Sill, Claudia Lennear, and Essra Mohawk. Neil Young, I see you (& thanks for singing for Standing Rock). I spent the early 1970s toddling behind my dear lil’ Pamunkey mother from the Shenandoah Valley at the bluegrass tents of Folklife Festival, snuck viewings of my favorite show Hee-Haw (’twas grand to see Roy Clark pickin’ an’ grinnin’ on the CMA, yep?), dreaming of growing up to play the Grand Ole Opry (at the Mother Church Ryman, of course) just like Darius Rucker; he ain’t the only one! Sweetheart Of the Rodeo by The Byrds & The Notorious Byrd Brothers were always & still are major for me. I am talented, and I am well-versed in the breadth and depth of country; I am extremely proud of my southern roots. All we want, after so many moons of flying the freak-flag high for Black Hillbilly & Native Americana, is to have a permanent non-conditional seat at the (farm) table, per Mrs. Knowles-Carter’s great sister Solange.

As I go prepare to march for Standing Rock again this weekend through all of Manhattan, please note that the date for the Jalopy Theater water protectors benefit in Brooklyn has been changed to 25 November. Follow the new Cactus Rose band Instagram account at @cactusroselovesyou  for more details as they are announced. I continue my personal commitment to ongoing activism on behalf of the Standing Rock water protectors, and the band & I are very much looking forward to playing with our friends from the Brooklyn Country scene! I expect this to be one of my treasured highlights of #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth 2016

A’ho*

 

 


Project Americana: The American Slave Coast: Live in Amsterdam News

Here’s the first press for our #ProjectAmericana undertaking tonight in Manhattan at Symphony Space — from Harlem’s own Amsterdam News THE AMERICAN SLAVE COAST: LIVE in NYC

Enjoy your TGIF & see y’all out tonight! A’ho, #KandiaCrazyHorse

20161015_165708_1476644650552 (Kandia Crazy Horse & DJ Soul Punk aka Teddy K in East Harlem with effigy of Frida Kahlo, #fbf)


Kandia Crazy Horse live in Project Americana @ Symphony Space NYC on October 28

Thanks to my dear friends Ned Sublette & Constance Sublette, I will be performing later this month at an event related to their weighty tome about the domestic, Southeastern slave trade in America during the antebellum era: THE AMERICAN SLAVE COAST

Their book has won the 2016 American Book Award, and we are delighted to help illuminate the dark history about the networks of trading Virginia Africans into the Deep South, the roles of American Presidents Thomas Jefferson & Andrew Jackson aka “Sharp Knife” (known by we of Indian Country as a bane to Native Americans yet most are hardly aware of his ownership of enslaved Africans) in slave trading, and also bringing forth the narratives of the Africans brought to U.S. shores themselves — amongst my portion of performance, I shall be reading a “Letter From Virginia,” to represent ye olde home state.

This event of Project Americana will be at the Peter Jay Sharp Theatre of Symphony Space in Manhattan, 28 October @ 8pm. Right now, a limited amount of $10 tickets are available online: PROJECT AMERICANA – THE AMERICAN SLAVE COAST: LIVE

Hope to see y’all out! Here’s the gallery of outlaw artists who I will be performing with:

kandiacrazyhorsephotobycamaradiaholloway (Kandia Crazy Horse by Camara Dia Holloway)

nonahendryx (Nona Hendryx (of Labelle))

carlhancockrux

Carl Hancock Rux

 

constancesublettepublicityshotphotobynedsublette

Constance Sublette

donaldharrison

New Orleans bandleader/composer Donald Harrison 

jonathandemmephotobybobvergara

Jonathan Demme

lezlieharrison

Lezlie Harrison

nedsublettepublicityshotphotobyconstancesublette

Ned Sublette by Constance Sublette


Sacred Water Medicine Show: My Standing Rock water protectors benefit concert in NYC #mniwiconi #NoDAPL

Good Friday, y’all! I am now getting feedback & documentation from the Standing Rock water protector camps benefit I conceived, curated & performed at last Saturday in Manhattan @ Decolonize This Place (Artists Space) in TriBeCa. Such was the response, I have been asked to undertake some more & when things develop, I will be sharing the word here & on my Instagram. Regardless, my personal commitment to praying for & helping support the Oceti Sakowin & other united nations assembled @ Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota remains unabated; the setbacks to the trips I was slated on since August were unavoidable, yet I still plan to be of service there. And we of the Eastern nations are paying attention to the similar projects here in our own “backyard,” such as the Algonquin Pipeline, & doing actions locally.

My #IndigenousWeek in NYC concludes tomorrow with the re-opening of the Caribbean Cultural Center (CCCADI) in Harlem on 125th Street. More to come! A’ho*

“Water Is Life – Solidarity Concert” on Saturday, October 8th, 2016 (All photographs by Camara Dia Holloway)

14590381_10210341608754587_4728288835212698825_n-2 (Kandia Crazy Horse giving the Introduction to the benefit concert @ Decolonize This Place in TriBeCa, by Camara Dia Holloway)
14691258_531632583697326_3077662141286453516_o (Kandia Crazy Horse & Morgan O’Kane, singers/songwriters/purveyors of twang & Appalachian-rooted mountain music, from Virginia)
14753196_531637043696880_5792530365201464589_o (With my lead guitar player/singer Jeff McLaughlin – Cactus Rose by Theodore Kuhnapfel)
14729315_10210341609234599_3472715491501719080_n (Alex Battles)
14681610_10210341609314601_8736319201832742049_n (Lonnie Harrington)
14590405_10210341610274625_4485607832802687523_n (Morgan O’Kane)
14713560_531645400362711_8164107098134039851_n (Ebony Hillbillies)
14681833_10210341610834639_3725016544496197947_n (Bejike Luis Sanakori Ramos doing water ceremony & closing dance)
14724638_10210341608674585_1973248216076382922_n (My Tsalagi aunty Eagle Woman (our hostess & emcee) & the gang getting the shoutout on the welcome wall @ Decolonize This Place)
14595565_529544267239491_2293595528462129051_n (Rehearsing for the Standing Rock benefit earlier last week in Midtown, with Alex & Lonnie)

 


Throwback Thursday: Kandia Crazy Horse @ Indigenous Day of Remembrance NYC 10/9/16

Once again, we had a great day out at this event sponsored by the Eagle & Condor Community Center of Astoria, Queens, NY — despite the rains, which seemed to clear when the little Quechua girls of Ñukanchik Llakta Wawakuna started dancing. This year’s theme was focused on women & we Native women warriors; I sang one of my songs, about being a Virginia Native American sacred wild woman, “Bury My Heart In Rock Creek Park,” danced in the circle, and participated in ceremonies including the burning of the “Doctrine of the Discovery” as pictured below. Photos of me by my sisters-in-struggle Melissa Terra Makuriwa Ulto (Taina) & Alexis Stern.

14566194_10153769545346541_7577327285516561517_o (Sisters-in-Struggle @ Indigenous Day of Remembrance in Central Park / Columbus Circle NYC, by Melissa Terra Makuriwa Ulto)
14567438_10153769555816541_6449866400796535231_o (Prayers up! Kandia Crazy Horse @ Indigenous Day of Remembrance in Central Park NYC, by Melissa Terra Makuriwa Ulto)
14570577_10153769563411541_4508482269982042701_o (Listening to Brother Lance First Eagle, Oglala Lakota from Pine Ridge Reservation & nephew of Russell Means, speak while our Filipino #NoDAPL chronicler, Dan Vea, films)
14601080_1133396400082206_61976063757826053_n (Group photo by Josefina Dilonez)
14666268_10154001684836274_3581053896861018704_n (My Brother Bejike Luis Sanakori Ramos of Eagle & Condor Community Center + Naguake Borinken & I by the altar)
14695378_10154001684761274_4338494170273633620_n (Performing the ceremonial burning, with Heather Henson looking on)

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Indigenous Peoples Day 2016

Howdy y’all of Indian Country & beyond! Although my trip to Standing Rock (departing yesterday) was postponed, I am coming off a whirlwind of three days’ activity about the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance & working to establish Indigenous Peoples Day in NYC and throughout Turtle Island. My benefit for our Standing Rock water protectors, the Sacred Water Medicine Show (AKA Water Is Life – Solidarity Concert), went very well Saturday night in TriBeCa & there are some possible future shows in store – stay tuned! Will be posting photographs & live footage soon.

Sunday, despite the rains, we were at Central Park across from Columbus Circle, commemorating our Ancestors & holding forth on the experiences and leadership of Native women @ the Indigenous Day of Remembrance; I sang one of my original songs, and participated in some ceremonies besides dancing. Photos to come…

Yesterday, I did another action with Decolonize This Place: the Anti-Columbus Day Tour of the American Museum of Natural History for their #DecolonizeThisMuseum event. Here below is the press thus far that contains parts of interviews I gave on the topics of Indigenous Peoples Day, the benefit, and why I am #StandingWithStandingRock as an indigenous revolutionary to the Guardian (UK), The Nation, & the paper that I used to write for/help edit, the Village Voice. Yes, we (mostly) covered the infamous statue of Theodore Roosevelt that fronts the entrance to the Museum, but we also spread some very important messages. This is a heady Indigenous Week of a lot of related events here in NYC, and you will see me out — after I finally get a disco nap! A’ho*

14642037_10209172304698146_5484341417449614873_n (Kandia Crazy Horse reading the Indigenous Peoples Day 2016 declaration, on the covered statue of Theodore Roosevelt with African & Native American men @ American Museum of Natural History NYC – Credit: Betty Yu)

READ:

Kandia Crazy Horse on Indigenous Peoples Day for Guardian UK

Kandia Crazy Horse on Decolonize This Museum & Indigenous Peoples Day in the Village Voice

 

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My Sacred Water Medicine Show – A benefit for Standing Rock in NYC on 10/8 #mniwiconi #NoDAPL

Please join us this Saturday night in Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighborhood downtown as I and my fellow indigenous artists & friends from the Brooklyn Country scene sing in support of the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance and in solidarity with the Oceti Sakowin of Standing Rock Reservation and all allied nations of the water protector camps that are defending the Missouri River and Lakota sacred sites out in North Dakota. All of the artists involved & I are committed to standing with Standing Rock until the end. We will also be featuring speakers on the topics of #NoDAPL, the Algonquin pipeline project, the Anti-Mountaintop Removal movement (particularly important to Morgan O’Kane & I, hailing from Virginia), & other environmental issues affecting Indian Country — some of whom have just returned from the frontline at Standing Rock.

We look forward to seeing you out – be ready to bust some of yer square-dancing moves!

WATER IS LIFE – SOLIDARITY CONCERT @ Decolonize This Place, 55 Walker Street btwn Church & Broadway, NYC |  6pm doors, 7pm show | $10 suggested donation

ft. KANDIA CRAZY HORSE (Pamunkey)

EBONY HILLBILLIES (Catawba)

LONNIE HARRINGTON (Seminole)

MORGAN O’KANE

ALEX BATTLES

BEJIKE LUIS SANAKORI RAMOS+BAND OF TAINOS (Taino)

& TINA EAGLE WOMAN JOHNSON (Tsalagi)

+ SPECIAL GUESTS

waterislifesolidarityconcert


Sacred Water Medicine Show in NYC on 10/8 @ 7pm #NoDAPL

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Dear Family, Friends, Followers & Folks – Come on out to the Standing Rock benefit concert that I conceived, curated & will perform at on Saturday, October 8th, in Manhattan @ Decolonize This Place, 55 Walker Street, 7pm (doors 6pm), $10 suggested donation. We will be having an evening of indigenous musicians and visual artists coming together with our allied friends from the Brooklyn Country scene to sing, dance, speak about the pipeline resistance & generally raise a joyful noise standing in solidarity with the Standing Rock Oceti Sakowin, united Native nations from across America, and their allies as they winterize to combat the Bakken project afflicting sacred burial sites, the Standing Rock reservation, and lands and water all along the Missouri River.

The featured performers:

Kandia Crazy Horse (Pamunkey)

Ebony Hillbillies (Catawba)

Morgan O’Kane

Alex Battles

Lonnie Harrington (Seminole)

Luis Sanakori Ramos+Band of Tainos (Taino)

& Special Guests including Jana Brownbear, Anastasia McAllister, Bianca Dagga & More

Emcee/speaker: Tina Eagle Woman Johnson of Cherokee Language & Cultural Circle NYC

Facebook evite: Water Is Life – Solidarity Concert

p1030486 Kandia Crazy Horse (credit: Camara Dia Holloway)

13568787_492125720981346_5104601475048609822_oTina Eagle Woman Johnson (credit: Kandia Crazy Horse)

img_0436 Henrique Prince of Ebony Hillbillies (@the recent Harlem Hoedown) (credit: Kandia Crazy Horse)


Kandia Crazy Horse x Decolonize This Place NYC

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Kandia Crazy Horse (left) & Amy from Decolonize This Place @ the opening launch in TriBeCa – Amongst the many great allies I have met up with during my engagement with the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance, I include Amy (above), Brotha Amir Husain & the rest of the gang from the new Manhattan artists & revolutionary action space, Decolonize This Place. They will be hosting ongoing actions and events at their space including my own Sacred Water Medicine Show on Saturday, October 8th, 2016 @ 7pm. Check them out on Facebook to see their scheduling. We really connected at the #NoDAPL rally in Washington Square Park in early September, and will continue to be united in the pipeline resistance amongst other pressing causes affecting Indian Country, Palestine, the Boogiedown Bronx, and beyond


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Stop the Black Snake #NoDAPL

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Pamunkey Strong in Solidarity with Standing Rock & the Oceti Sakowin #NoDAPL

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On Talk Music Talk with boice – Episode #47

Listen & download HERE


The next Hudson Canyon Sing: Sunday, September 6th in Brooklyn, NY

Join us for a fine African-Native American frolic upSouth in Prospect Heights next Sunday afternoon @ 4:30pm, between the 69th Annual Shinnecock Nation Powwow on Long Island & the Federation of Black Cowboys’ cookout in The Hole. Featuring AfroKelt & Native artists: Tess Reese (Choctaw), Johnny Jackpot, Kandia Crazy Horse (Pamunkey)

HCS 9-6ALL FRIENDS & FAMILY MOST WELCOME!


On the Radio!

Evan Taylor on drums

Evan Taylor on drums

Me in front of the booth (w/ DJ Duane just visible) after my interview

Me in front of the booth (w/ DJ Duane just visible) after my interview

Johnny w/ banjo & "His master's voice"

Johnny w/ banjo & “His master’s voice”


Kandia Crazy Horse & the Spirit of ’76 live taping on New Jersey’s WFMU

#FollowFriday #fbf >>>>—–)))—> From earlier this week, via ANA group; we had a fine ole time during my live taping in Jersey City on DJ Duane Harriott’s (Bim Marx/Negroclash/Other Music) radio show. Dig it: “On this week’s Duane Train, we shine a Native Artist spotlight on Kandia Crazy Horse, a country & western / Native Americana artist who is Pamunkey. Kandia (pictured doin’ it in the Park, oh yeah) & her band the Spirit of ’76 will talk about the meta-Afrolachian source of her sounds, perform live here in the WFMU studio, and share her love of vinyl collecting out of the Laurel Canyon & southern deeps.” Tune in 8/26, 12-3pm @ 91.1 FM in Jersey City, NY / 90.1 FM Hudson Valley, NY – or online @ WFMU.org | kandiacrazyhorse.com | T: @kandiacrazyhoss | IG: @kandiacrazyhorse          

YlFKnDBazpyJCEvpZnpiyO9xqs7hUMDZ7Jt30sZNedSxJMwQNmg21ilCRWikvkV8ONzulAEI5DAG6ucYzcYtJSymSq74BDJM8ft9nfHd2OPCNIAZdrNOFPAWh1V1_6ha-nda5j3bBk-WSHrRl9TrW_PSWF7EV-uHMKfBL7Y5HFvNL5JO7QEKRUSKneINfKrRuAY0NB-C8vYb0147-qLY2vEYGI9PkallY’all can now hear the show from the WFMU Archive HERE              


From the Spirit of ’76 Road Trip to Washington DC

Ikons & Images from my recent live medicine show on the “Capital Americana Series” @ Gypsy Sally’s club in Georgetown, Washington DC:

photo 1photo 3photo 5photo 2photo 3photo 4photo 2photo 3photo 1

Civil Rights Movement legends & fellow travelers in power @ my show: Joyce Ladner, Philippa Thompson Jackson, Ed Darden, Juadine Henderson, Jacqueline Trescott, Courtland Cox, Judy Richardson

Civil Rights Movement legends & fellow travelers in power @ my show: Joyce Ladner, Philippa Thompson Jackson, Ed Darden, Juadine Henderson, Jacqueline Trescott, Courtland Cox, Judy Richardson

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Hudson Canyon Sing

My debut Medicine Show ft. the Spirit of ’76, Tess Reese of Treasury & Evan Taylor – photograph by Tavia Nyong’O

Yesterday, Sunday 9 August @ Branded Saloon, Brooklyn

Yesterday, Sunday 9 August @ Branded Saloon, Brooklyn


Live in Washington DC on 8/13

Come check me out & hear some Chocolate City / #DMV -born country & western sounds!

All the way live…on the Capital Americana Series @ Gypsy Sally’s Georgetown

DC Flyer


Hudson Canyon Sing this Sunday 8/9 in Brooklyn

At long last, I am bringing the twangtent of the dear departed Harlem Honky-Tonk to Brooklyn Country, Sisters & Brothers, for Branded Saloon’s Honky-Tonk’n Roundup in Prospect Heights: the Hudson Canyon Sing ft. myself, the Spirit of ’76 & special guest Evan Taylor (Bernie Worrell Orchestra, Chapin Sisters). C’mon out & support if you can, NYC / NJ / CT, so we can make this a regular thang!

Branded Saloon @ 603 Vanderbilt Avenue and Bergen Street, Brooklyn NY  |  2-4pm

Kandia Crazy Horse

Kandia Crazy Horse

Evan Taylor

Evan Taylor